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Why Does My Bladder Always Feel Full

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What Is Bladder Fullness

How to Empty Bladder Contents to Overcome Bladder Emptying Problems

Bladder fullness is a sensation that the bladder is filled to capacity and there is a need to urinate. This is also known as urinary or bladder urging. It is normal sensation that every person experiences as the bladder fills close to its maximum capacity. It serves as a signal that a person needs to find the appropriate facility to urinate. Although the sensation can be ignored for a period of time if the situation is not suitable, the sensation gradually intensifies until a person can no longer bear it or a person may end up urinating involuntarily.

However, sometimes the bladder fullness sensation occurs even after passing urine or with there being only small amounts of urine contained within the bladder compared to its normal capacity. In these cases the sensation is abnormal and most likely a symptom of some underlying disease of the bladder. It is more correctly known as urinary or vesical tenesmus. Although the causes of this bladder fullness sensation is largely the same for both males and females, there are some conditions which are specific to each gender that results in this abnormal feeling.

How Is Ic Diagnosed

There are no tests that make a definitive diagnosis of IC, so many cases of IC go undiagnosed. Because IC shares many of the same symptoms of other bladder disorders, your doctor needs to rule these out first. These other disorders include:

There is no cure or definitive treatment for IC. Most people use a combination of treatments, and you may have to try several approaches before you settle on the therapy that provides the most relief. Following are some IC treatments.

What You Need To Know

  • Interstitial cystitis is a chronic pain condition. Diagnosis and treatment can be difficult, as the exact cause is unknown.
  • No specific test exists to diagnose interstitial cystitis it is often diagnosed after other conditions have been ruled out.
  • Genetic and immune disorders, recurrent bacterial infections, and pelvic floor dysfunction are possible factors that can lead to this condition.
  • Excessive frequency of urination, urinary urgency, and urethra, bladder or pelvic pain are common symptoms.
  • Treatment is divided into five phases, ranging from lifestyle changes to injections to surgery.

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Symptoms Of Frequent Or Painful Urination

Frequent or painful urination can be a symptom of a variety of health conditions requiring treatment.

Symptoms of frequent urination that call for a visit to the physician as soon as possible include:

  • Pain in the lower abdomen, side or groin
  • Painful urination
  • Blood in the urine, or red or dark brown urine. This can be a dangerous sign and should always be evaluated.
  • A powerful urge to urinate
  • Difficulty urinating, or trouble emptying the bladder completely
  • Fever
  • Discharge from the vagina or penis
  • Loss of bladder control.

People should see a physician when urinary frequency increases with no obvious cause , especially if other symptoms are present.

Symptoms accompanying painful urination requiring medical attention are:

  • Painful urination lasting more than one day
  • Discharge from the penis or vagina
  • Blood in the urine
  • For pregnant women, any painful urination.

What Are The Symptoms Of Ic

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People with interstitial cystitis have repeat discomfort, pressure, tenderness or pain in the bladder, lower abdomen, and pelvic area. Symptoms vary from person to person, may be mild or severe, and can even change in each person as time goes on.

Symptoms may include a combination of these symptoms:

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What Behavioral Changes Can I Make To Help With Overactive Bladder

There are many techniques and changes to your typical behavior that you can try to help with an overactive bladder. These can include:

Keeping a log: During a typical day, write down your fluid intake, the number of times you urinate, the number of accidents and when they occur. Make a note about what happened when the accident happened, like when you:

  • Cough.
  • Laugh.
  • Were unable to reach the bathroom in time.

Monitoring your diet: Eliminate or decrease foods or beverages that may worsen your bladder symptoms. These could include:

  • Tea.
  • Spicy and acidic foods and drinks.
  • Foods and drinks that contain artificial sweeteners.

Maintaining bowel regularity: Constipation can place added pressure on the bladder and have a negative effect on your bladder function. By keeping healthy bowel habits, you may be able to avoid constipation and help to lessen bladder symptoms. The following are some suggestions for maintaining bowel regularity:

  • Increase your fiber intake by eating foods like beans, pasta, oatmeal, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, and fresh fruit and vegetables.
  • Every morning, take 2 tablespoons of this mixture: 1 cup apple sauce, 1 cup unprocessed wheat bran, and ¾ cup prune juice.
  • Exercise regularly to maintain regular bowel movements.

Maintaining a healthy weight: Being overweight can add pressure on your bladder, which may contribute to bladder control problems. If you are overweight, weight loss can reduce the pressure on your bladder.

Get A Diagnosis Not A Self

Its also important to consider whether the uterus and other organs of the gynecological system could be causing bladder pain, Siddiqui says, as they are close to the bladder. Pelvic floor dysfunction, such as tightness or spasms of the pelvic muscles, commonly occurs with bladder pain and may make bladder pain worse, she explains. Pelvic pain can also be caused by endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, or ovarian cysts. Additionally, gastrointestinal problems such as inflammatory bowel diseases can sometimes be the source of pelvic pain, notes Mayo Clinic.

If none of these conditions are present and women have ongoing bladder pain, they are typically treated for bladder pain syndrome, which refers to painful conditions of the bladder where other causes such as UTI and cancer have been excluded,” says Siddiqui.

The bottom line for women to keep in mind: Dont self-diagnose your bladder pain. Addressing and treating the issue can offer relief for body and mind.

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What Is Frequent Urination

Inconvenient and disruptive to your daily life, frequent urination is when you need to urinate many times throughout a 24-hour period. This is a symptom of many different conditions and can have a wide variety of solutions. At some points in your life, like during pregnancy, you may need to pee more frequently. This can be a normal symptom of something like pregnancy and it usually passes after birth. However, frequent urination can be linked to other health issues that arent normal parts of life and dont fade over time. It can be a symptom of more serious conditions like diabetes, overactive bladder syndrome, UTIs or prostate problems. Needing to urinate frequently can even disturb your sleep. That full bladder that keeps waking you up in the middle of an otherwise good nights sleep is a condition called nocturia.

In many cases, your healthcare provider can help relieve this symptom by treating the underlying condition.

How Doctors Diagnose The Cause Of Bladder Pressure

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If you have bladder pressure and feel like you need to urinate frequently, its a good idea to make an appointment with your doctor. In some cases, these symptoms may be signs of a UTI. If you truly have IC, your doctor should still be able to help.

Your doctor may ask you to start keeping a log of your symptoms to bring to your appointment. You should write down how much you drink, how much you urinate, and any pain or pressure you experience.

At your appointment, you will first assess your medical history. Theyll also perform a pelvic exam and test a urine sample to rule out infection.

Other tests include:

Cystoscopy: Your doctor will insert a thin tube into your urethra to look at the inside of your bladder. Youll be numbed beforehand, so this procedure shouldnt hurt.

Biopsy: Your doctor will put you under anesthesia. Then, theyll take some tissue from your bladder and urethra for examination. Your doctor will check the tissue for symptoms of bladder cancer and other causes of pain.

Urine cytology: This urine sample test allows your doctor to examine the cells for cancer.

Potassium sensitivity test: After placing water and potassium chloride into your bladder, your doctor will ask you to rate your pain and need to urinate on a scale from 0 to 5. People with normal bladders usually cant tell a difference between the two solutions. If youre more sensitive to the potassium chloride, it may indicate IC.

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Abnormal Bladder Fullness Sensation

There are several ways that an abnormal bladder sensation arises.

  • The bladder does not empty fully or at all in which case the sensation cannot truly be considered abnormal.
  • The bladder wall is irritated and causes abnormal sensations of bladder fullness despite the bladder being empty.
  • External pressure on the bladder wall from surrounding organs.

Less commonly, problems with the nerves that carry impulses from the bladder may be responsible for an abnormal full bladder sensation.

Urinary Tract Infections : More Common In Women

Urinary tract infections, sometimes called bladder infections, strike women more often than men, and simple anatomy is the cause.

The female urethra is closer to areas that have natural bacteria, such as the anus and vagina. Its also shorter than a mans urethra, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases .

Bladder pain from UTIs can happen at any age. In young women, it is a common symptom of urinary tract infections, along with frequent and painful urination. Symptoms in older women can vary but typically include muscle aches, abdominal pain, fatigue, and weakness.

Its important to see your doctor because treatment with antibiotics like Macrobid or Bactrim can usually clear up a urinary tract infection, the NIDDK notes.

And though the infection may go away without treatment, antibiotics can speed healing and quickly eliminate uncomfortable symptoms. Drinking extra fluids and urinating frequently will also help treat the infection and your discomfort.

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Causes Of Painful Urination

Several kinds of infection or inflammation can cause painful urination. These include:

  • Urethritis and prostatitis. These two inflammatory conditions are the most frequent causes of painful urination in men.
  • Vaginal infection, such as a yeast infection. Women who have a vaginal infection may notice vaginal odor, discharge and painful urination.
  • Sexually transmitted infections. STIs such as chlamydia, genital herpes and gonorrhea can cause painful urination.
  • Can be caused by:
  • Irritation of the urethra from sexual activity or activities like bicycling or horseback riding.
  • Irritation from douches, spermicides, bubble baths, soap or toilet paper with fragrance.
  • Side effects of certain medications, supplements and treatments.
  • Stones in the urinary tract.
  • Vaginal changes related to menopause .
  • Tumor in the urinary tract.

Bloating Frequent Urination And Pressure Or Fullness

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Bloating, urinary frequency, and pressure is consistent with urinary obstruction from benign prostastic hypertrophy, prostate cancer, cystitis , and bladder or rectal or uterine prolapse. Call your doctor if it persists.

While the list below can be considered as a guide to educate yourself about these conditions, this is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a health care provider. There are many other medical conditions that also can be associated with your symptoms and signs. Here are a number of those from MedicineNet:

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Bladder Infection Signs: How To Spot Them

By Amory Urgent Care

The pain can be so intense you almost cant walktrip after trip to the bathroom with no relief in sight. You might be experiencing the painful side effects of a bladder infection.

Urinary tract infections or UTIs can manifest as bladder infections. They affect more than 150 million people each year, and when left untreated, they can pose serious health risks.

But what are the bladder infection signs, and how do you spot them?

We have put together a comprehensive list of signs to help you identify a bladder infection so you can get the medical treatment you need as soon as possible.

Frequent Urination In Women

What is frequent urination?

Frequent urination is the need to urinate more than you normally would. The urge can strike suddenly and can cause you to lose control of your bladder. It can feel uncomfortable, like your bladder is extremely full.

Frequent urination is also referred to as having an overactive bladder. Urologists, who are doctors that specialize in the urinary system, consider going more than 8 times in 24 hours to be frequent urination.

The key to treating frequent urination is addressing the underlying cause.

A urinary tract infection is a common cause of frequent urination. This happens when bacteria enter the bladder through the urethra.

Its estimated that 50 to 60 percent of women will experience at least one UTI in their lives. One-third of women will experience one before the age of 24 thats severe enough to require antibiotics.

Women are more at risk for a UTI than men because their urethras are shorter. Bacteria have less distance to travel before they can infect the urinary tract and cause symptoms.

Common risk factors for a UTI include:

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What Is Oab And Who Gets It Your Browser Does Not Support Html5 Audio Playback You May Download The Audio File Directly Here

Overactive bladder is the name for a group of bladder symptoms. There are three main symptoms:

  • A feeling that you have to go to the bathroom, urgently.
  • Sometimes incontinence, which means that you leak urine with the “gotta go” feeling.
  • Usually the need to go to the bathroom often , day and night.

With OAB, you feel that you need to empty your bladder even when it’s not full. This leads to the feeling that you need a bathroom quickly, right now. You can’t control or ignore this feeling. If you “gotta go” eight or more times each day and night, or fear that urine will leak out before youre ready, you may have OAB.

OAB affects about 33 million Americans. It’s not a normal part of aging. It’s a health problem that can last for a long time if it’s not treated. Many older men and women struggle with OAB symptoms. Often people don’t know about treatments that can help, or they don’t ask for help.

Stress urinary incontinence or SUI is a different bladder problem. People with SUI leak urine while sneezing, laughing or being active. It is not the same as that sudden “gotta go” feeling from OAB. To learn more about SUI, go to .

In this guide you will find clear information about how to manage OAB. Please ask for help, even if you feel embarrassed. Don’t wait, because there are several treatments that work well for OAB. Your health care provider should be trained to talk with you and help you manage your symptoms without embarrassment.

What Does Bladder Pressure Feel Like

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The most noticeable symptom of IC is pain and pressure in the bladder. The pain you experience may range from mild to severe. For some, the pressure can come and go. For others, the feeling doesnt let up.

These symptoms may lead you to think that you have a bladder infection, but IC isnt an infection at all. Its a chronic condition, which means that there isnt cure.

Other symptoms of IC include:

  • pelvic pain
  • pain while bladder is full and relief when its emptied
  • pain during sex

Signs and symptoms vary. Some people may need to urinate up to 60 times each day. You may also experience periods of time when you have no symptoms.

Although IC isnt a UTI, getting an infection can make your symptoms worse.

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How The Urinary Tract Works And What Happens With Oab Your Browser Does Not Support Html5 Audio Playback You May Download The Audio File Directly Here

The urinary tract is the important system that removes liquid waste from our bodies:

  • kidneys: two bean-shaped organs that clean waste from the blood and make urine
  • ureters: two thin tubes that take urine from the kidney to the bladder
  • bladder: a balloon-like sac that holds urine until it’s time to go to the bathroom
  • urethra: the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. The urethra has muscles called sphincters that lock in urine. The sphincters open to release urine when the bladder contracts.

When your bladder is full, your brain signals the bladder. The bladder muscles then squeeze. This forces the urine out through the urethra. The sphincters in the urethra open and urine flows out. When your bladder is not full, the bladder is relaxed.

With a healthy bladder, signals in your brain let you know that your bladder is getting full or is full, but you can wait to go to the bathroom. With OAB, you can’t wait. You feel a sudden, urgent need to go. This can happen even if your bladder isn’t full.

Path To Improved Health

There are several conditions that can cause painful urination. The most common is a urinary tract infection . The urinary tract consists of the kidneys, bladder, and urethra. The urethra is the tube that carries urine out of the body. Bacteria can build in the tract when waste isnt removed or the bladder isnt emptied correctly. This causes an infection. Swelling and irritation from the infection can make urination uncomfortable.

Sometimes painful urination can occur even if you dont have a UTI. Other causes include:

  • Medicines. Certain medicines, like some used in cancer chemotherapy, may inflame the bladder.
  • Something pressing against the bladder. This could be an ovarian cyst or a kidney stone stuck near the entrance to the bladder.
  • Vaginal infection or irritation.
  • Sensitivity to chemicals in products. Douches, vaginal lubricants, soaps, scented toilet paper, or contraceptive foams or sponges may contain chemicals that cause irritation.
  • Sexually transmitted infections. Gonorrhea, chlamydia, or herpes can cause urination to be painful for some people.
  • Prostate infection

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