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Why Do I Get Frequent Bladder Infections

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And It Won’t Hurt To Try These

Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) | What You Need to Know About UTIs | IntroWellness

Like many women, you may have memorized the following age-old advice for preventing UTIs:

  • Wipe from front to back.

  • Urinate before and after sex.

  • Drink lots of water.

  • Avoid tight underpants and jeans.

These suggestions are directed at flushing the bladder and keeping E. coli from spreading into the urinary tract. Although studies have failed to show that they prevent either primary or recurrent UTIs, there’s no harm in trying them, Dr. Gupta says. “They can’t hurt, and if they help, you’re ahead of the game.”

How Are Antibiotics For Uti Selected

If you arrive at a clinic with a UTI, there are three things your doctor doesnt yet know:

  • Which pathogen is causing your infection

  • Which classes of antibiotic will effectively treat that bacterium

  • The resistance of that bacterium to different antibiotic classes

  • Your doctor may send your urine sample to a lab for testing, but if you are in a lot of discomfort in the meantime, they may prescribe according to a few common guidelines on how UTI antibiotics are selected, along with their best-educated guess.

    If your antibiotics arent working, there are a few possible reasons why:

    • It might not be the right antibiotic

    • Your symptoms may be caused by more than one organism – so your antibiotic might not be treating the entire bacterial community

    • Your symptoms may not be caused by bacteria

    • You may have an embedded infection that requires longer term treatment.

    Ineffective antibiotic treatment may in fact contribute to the recurrence of UTI by allowing bacteria to increase their resistance to that type of antibiotic.

    Reframing Your Physical Symptoms

    Even with the possible solutions mentioned above, the changes in your reproductive and urinary organs at menopause can be irritating. Sometimes, rather than a physical solution to these challenges, a psychological “fix” might be the answer. When we can’t change a situation in life, sometimes we can still change our emotional response to the situation. This is where reframing can be helpful.

    Cognitive reframing is a tool in which a situation does not change, but your reaction to the situation or your perspective on the situation does change. With menopausal symptoms, this may include looking not at the negatives of your situation, but the positives instead. Instead of focusing on your vaginal dryness and how it affects your sex life, perhaps focus on how you are free to have sex whenever you wish without the thought of birth control. If the cost of vaginal lubricants disturbs you, consider how much money you are saving on pads and tampons. There is also a freedom that comes with no longer needing to make sure you have these menstrual products on hand.

    Reframing is not always easy to do, and sometimes you may need to “fake it until you make it.” Yet there are often a number of hidden silver linings in nearly any situation.

    Trying to create a sense of gratitude can also be helpful. Many people have found that keeping a gratitude journal is a good way to shift their frame of mind from the negative to the positive. Try to think of three positives in your life each and every day.

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    If You Have Gone Through The Menopause Vaginal Oestrogen May Be An Option

    If you have gone through the menopause and had your last natural period , your hormone levels will have dropped. As explained earlier, this leads to changes in the vagina and the urethra that can increase the chances of getting recurrent cystitis, as well as other problems like dryness and painful sex. You can read more about this in the separate leaflet called Vaginal Dryness .

    Vaginal oestrogen has been shown to reduce the number of bouts of cystitis in postmenopausal women who get recurrent cystitis. However, it is not as effective as taking antibiotics regularly. It is usually taken as an estradiol tablet that you insert into your vagina at night twice a week or as a ring that releases estradiol continuously and stays in the vagina for three months at a time. It can help even in postmenopausal women who don’t have any of the other vaginal symptoms.

    Why Do I Get Bladder Infections All The Time

    Why do I get Recurrent Urinary tract infections?

    Are you one of those women who get cystitis very often? Well, you are not alone! It is estimated that at least 50 % of women will get a urinary infection in their lifetimes of those, about 30% will get another episode after a short period of time.

    Lets try to understand the problem and learn how to reduce the chances of repeated infections

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    Can Recurrent Utis Be A Sign Of Cancer

    Both UTIs and bladder cancer can cause similar symptoms, such as a frequent need to urinate and even blood in the urine, according to the University of Rochester Medical Center.

    According to the American Cancer Society, urinary tract infections, kidney and bladder stones, and other causes of chronic bladder irritation have been linked to bladder cancer. However, its not clear whether recurrent urinary or bladder infections can actually cause bladder cancer or whether they constitute a true risk factor for bladder cancer.

    The biggest known risk factor for bladder cancer is smoking. The risk of bladder cancer also increases with age. Most people who get bladder cancer are over the age of 55.

    If you think you may have chronic or recurrent UTIs, its best to get checked out by your doctor. Your provider can rule out other health issues, including bladder cancer, and get you the treatment you need to get rid of chronic UTIs.

    Why Do Utis Return Despite Treatment

    There are about a half-dozen oral antibiotics that treat UTIs. Sometimes a doctor will prescribe one drug, then switch to another after a urine culture identifies which bacteria is at work. Adjusting the medication can take time, and recurrent infections may occur in the meantime.

    Sometimes a person starts to feel better and decides to stops taking the antibiotic contrary to the doctors instructions and another infection soon follows. Its never a good idea to stop taking antibiotics before your dosage is complete.

    But even people who take medication as the doctor prescribes may get recurrent infections, Dr. Vasavada says.

    If youre a younger woman who is sexually active, your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic to take before and after sexual activity. For post-menopausal women, a vaginal estrogen cream may help reduce infections.

    If infections persist, your doctor may test for other health problems in the kidney, bladder or other parts of the urinary system.

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    Causes Of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections In Women Are:

    • Sexual intercourse after long time: During sexual intercourse bacteria from genital region, and anus can easily enter into female urinary system. Women are also prone to get urinary tract infection after first intercourse ,after frequent intercourse and intercourse after a long gap.
    • Use of diaphragm as a birth control device: The diaphragm presses down on and narrows the urinary passage. This results in incomplete bladder emptying and recurrent urinary tract infections
    • Recurrent urinary tract infection in post menopausal women: The female hormone estrogen maintains an acidic pH of the female genital region which prevents rampant growth of germs. This protection is lowered after this hormone is lowered as part of menopausal hormonal changes.

    While conventional medicines will help take care of the infection, homoeopathic treatment for recurrent UTI offers great hope. Homoeopathic medicines reduce the frequency of attacks and help build up your immunity against the bacteria. Contact us today to know how homoeopathic treatment for UTI at LifeForce can help you. You may use the form below to get in touch with us. Alternately you could reach us at via a phone call on + 91-22-66-888888, or visit us at or email us at

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    Finding The Cause Of Cystitis

    How to Prevent a Urinary Tract Infection

    It is important for doctors to find the cause of cystitis in several different groups. The cause should be found in

    • Children

    • Analgesics as needed

    • Sometimes surgery

    Cystitis is usually treated with antibiotics. Before prescribing antibiotics, the doctor determines whether the person has a condition that would make cystitis more severe, such as diabetes or a weakened immune system , or more difficult to eliminate, such as a structural abnormality. Such conditions may require more potent antibiotics taken for a longer period of time, particularly because the infection is likely to return as soon as the person stops taking antibiotics. People with such conditions may also have infections caused by fungi or unusual bacteria and may thus require something other than the most commonly used antibiotics.

    For women, taking an antibiotic by mouth for 3 days is usually effective if the infection has not led to any complications, although some doctors prefer to give a single dose. For more stubborn infections, an antibiotic is usually taken for 7 to 10 days. For men, cystitis usually is caused by prostatitis Prostatitis Prostatitis is pain and swelling, inflammation, or both of the prostate gland. The cause is sometimes a bacterial infection. Pain can occur in the area between the scrotum and anus or in the… read more , and antibiotic treatment is usually required for weeks.

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    Risk Factors For Urinary Tract Infections

    And now a brief note about reproductive parts: Although people with penises do get UTIs, people with vaginas are more at risk. It all boils down to the anatomy, Minkin says.

    Bacteria that cause UTIs often make their way from the back door to the front and then up the urethra to wreak havoc on the urinary system.

    Because the male reproductive system has a longer urethra than the female reproductive system, the bacteria have farther to travel, which makes it more difficult for a UTI to develop.

    But regardless of anatomy, once youve had one UTI, youre more likely to get another, especially if you have a vagina. Hickling DR, et al. . Management of recurrent urinary tract infections in healthy adult women.

    What Can I Do To Prevent Recurrent Utis

    The majority of UTIs, about 90%, are caused by E. coli, a bacteria that naturally occurs in your intestines where its helpful. When this bacteria comes in contact with your urinary tract system, however, it can be harmful and lead to a UTI.

    For most people, simple hygiene and lifestyle changes can help prevent recurrent UTIs. To help stop a UTI before it starts, try implementing these tips:

    • Avoid spreading E. coli by washing your genitals with warm water and mild soap before and after sex.
    • Drink plenty of fluids to flush out any wandering bacteria from the urinary system.
    • Be sure to urinate after having sex to keep bacteria from lingering in the urethra.
    • When you feel the urge to urinate, go postponing urination increases your risk of developing a UTI.
    • Be sure to wipe from front to back to avoid spreading E. coli to the vagina.

    Ready to learn more about UTIs and how they affect older women? Experiencing symptoms of a UTI? Contact our Littleton office or book an appointment online now and the help you need!

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    You Dont Drink Enough Water

    Guzzling H2O will make you go pretty often. And thats a good thing. When you do this, the bacteria gets flushed out before they have a chance to grab hold, Minkin says.

    Consider that your cue to make a giant water bottle your BFF. Hooton TM, et al. . Effect of increased daily water intake in premenopausal women with recurrent urinary tract infections: A randomized clinical trial. DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.4204

    Why Are Women And Older Adults More At Risk

    Why do I keep getting urine infections?

    E. coli or other bacteria cause UTIs, which are infections in your kidneys, bladder, ureters or urethra. Unfortunately, women are more likely to get them mainly because of their anatomy.

    A womans urethra is shorter than a mans and closer to the anus. The urethra is also close to the vagina, which can collect bacteria during sex. So bacteria from both the anus and vagina have easy access to a womans urinary tract.

    Post-menopausal women are also at higher risk because pH changes in the vagina make it more susceptible to infection.

    Both men and women are more likely to get UTIs as they age. Certain medical conditions, such as bladder prolapse in women and enlarged prostate in men, cause incomplete bladder emptying in older adults. Urine that stays in your bladder too long can encourage bacteria to grow.

    Some newer diabetic drugs can also promote sugar in the urine and create conditions ideal for a UTI, Dr. Vasavada adds.

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    Are Some Women More At Risk For Utis

    Yes. You may be at greater risk for a UTI if you:1,5

    • Are sexually active. Sexual activity can move germs that cause UTIs from other areas, such as the vagina, to the urethra.
    • Use a diaphragm for birth control or use spermicides with a diaphragm or with condoms. Spermicides can kill good bacteria that protect you from UTIs.
    • Are pregnant. Pregnancy hormones can change the bacteria in the urinary tract, making UTIs more likely. Also, many pregnant women have trouble completely emptying the bladder, because the uterus with the developing baby sits on top of the bladder during pregnancy. Leftover urine with bacteria in it can cause a UTI.
    • Have gone through menopause. After menopause, loss of the hormone estrogen causes vaginal tissue to become thin and dry. This can make it easier for harmful bacteria to grow and cause a UTI.
    • Have diabetes, which can lower your immune system and cause nerve damage that makes it hard to completely empty your bladder
    • Have any condition, like a kidney stone, that may block the flow of urine between your kidneys and bladder
    • Have or recently had a catheter in place. A catheter is a thin tube put through the urethra into the bladder. Catheters drain urine when you cannot pass urine on your own, such as during surgery.

    How Do You Know If A Uti Has Spread To Your Kidneys2

    • Nausea / vomiting
    • Fever / chills

    Infection of the kidneys can be life threatening. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms and feel that you may have a more serious infection, it is important that you seek help from a medical professional straight away.

    But why are UTIs so common? And why do I keep getting them?

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    How Are Chronic Utis Treated

    If you have recurrent or chronic UTIs, your doctor may send you to a urologist who specializes in diseases of the urinary system. According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, some of the ways that recurrent UTIs are evaluated and treated include:

    • Testing The doctor will want to take a urine sample to test for bacteria and white blood cells. It may be necessary to do special X-ray studies to see if there is an obstruction or stones in the urinary tract. A urologist may look into your bladder by passing a special scope through the opening into your bladder. This exam is called cystoscopy.
    • Antibiotics for Treatment Normally, UTIs responds very well to antibiotics, and you may only need to take medication for a few days. For recurrent UTIs, antibiotics may be needed for 10 days or more.
    • Surgery In some cases of prostate disease, stones, or other obstruction of the urinary system, surgery may be done to restore normal flow of urine and help clear up infections.
    • Antibiotics for Prevention Some strategies to prevent recurrent UTIs with antibiotics include taking low-dose antibiotics for six months or taking antibiotics after sexual intercourse.
    • Frequent Urine Testing Women who have recurrent UTIs may benefit from testing their urine frequently with a dipstick that warns of any bacteria in the urine.

    When Should I Call The Doctor

    HOW TO CURE UTI’S, NATURALLY!! (Urinary Tract Infections)

    As soon as you think that your child has a UTI, call your doctor. The doctor may recommend another urine test after treatment to be sure that the infection has cleared.

    If your child has from recurrent UTIs, consult a pediatric urologist, who can do a thorough evaluation and order tests for urinary system abnormalities. In the meantime, follow your doctor’s instructions for treating a UTI.

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    Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections In Women: Diagnosis And Management

    CHARLES M. KODNER, MD, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky

    EMILY K. THOMAS GUPTON, DO, MPH, Primary Care Medical Center, Murray, Kentucky

    Am Fam Physician. 2010 Sep 15 82:638-643.

    Recurrent urinary tract infections are common in women and associated with considerable morbidity and health care use. The clinical features, diagnostic testing, and causative organisms are often similar to those of single cases of UTI, although there are additional treatment strategies and prevention measures to consider with recurrent UTIs.

    SORT: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE

    A urine culture with greater than 102 colony-forming units per mL is considered positive in patients who have symptoms of UTI.

    Clinical recommendation Evidence rating References

    Continuous and postcoital antimicrobial prophylaxis have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing the risk of recurrent UTIs.

    Cranberry products may reduce the incidence of recurrent symptomatic UTIs.

    Use of topical estrogen may reduce the incidence of recurrent UTIs in postmenopausal women.

    Treatment of complicated UTIs should begin with broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage, with adjustment of antimicrobial coverage guided by culture results.

    Prophylactic antimicrobial therapy to prevent recurrent UTIs is not recommended for patients with complicated UTIs.

    UTI = urinary tract infection.

    SORT: KEY RECOMMENDATIONS FOR PRACTICE

    UTI = urinary tract infection.

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