Monday, January 23, 2023

What Medications Treat Overactive Bladder

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The Food And Drinks That You Must Consume

Medications For Overactive Bladder

Today, most doctors recommend that managing an overactive bladder has to do with managing your diet. The doctors often recommend having baby food and adding others in the category to check what takes place. And because constipation can exacerbate or cause urinary incontinence, you can get ample fiber content by adding the following to your everyday diet:

  • Vegetables
  • Legumes
  • Grains

For the most part, you can opt-in for a trial-and-error process. You can try to eliminate specific diets or remove certain fluids to check if there is a favorable impact. Also, there are several juices that dont cause any harm to the bladder, like cranberry, apple, cherry, and grape.

However, you should be aware of the additives in the juices. According to a study in the Research and Reports in Urology, artificial sweeteners can maximize the chances of an overactive bladder. It can make the urine more acidic, manage urine odor and manage bacteria spread. Also, you should drink ample water, as thats the best way to keep your body hydrated.

Make sure to have at least six to eight glasses of water or fluids on a given day. If you drink less, then your urine can get concentrated and further irritate your bladder. And if you tend to drink more, you can overtax the bladder, and it will worsen.

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Non

To cite this guideline:

  • Lightner DJ, Gomelsky A, Souter L et al: Diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder in adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline amendment 2019. J Urol 2019 202: 558.
  • Gormley EA, Lightner DJ, Burgio KL et al: Diagnosis and treatment of overactive bladder in adults: AUA/SUFU guideline. J Urol 2012 188: 2455.

AUA/SUFU Guideline: Published 2012 Amended 2014, 2019 Endorsed by the American Urogynecologic Society

The clinical guideline on Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Neurogenic Overactive Bladder in Adults discusses patient presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients based on the currently available data.

Español translated guideline courtesy of Confederacion Americana de Urologia

Botox Injections For Oab

Botox® injections are also an option for treating Overactive Bladder. Injecting Botox, or onabotulinumtoxinA, into the bladder muscle blocks the nerve signal that triggers OAB, reducing the urgent need to urinate and the number of times you need to empty your bladder each day. A small percentage of people using botox have found the need to use a catheter if they experience urinary retention, and repeat injections may need to be performed.

For a list of the specific types of medications to treat OAB, .

If youre living with symptoms of Overactive Bladder, like frequency and urgency, watch the below video about managing OAB with Medications, our 4th video in a series about treating Overactive Bladder. Then talk with your doctor to see if medications may be an option for you.

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Anticholinergic Drugs For Oab

The largest class of drugs used to treat OAB is anticholinergic drugs. They work by blocking a chemical in your body called acetylcholine. This chemical sends a message to your bladder to contract. By blocking this chemical, these drugs reduce the contractions that cause you to release urine. In studies that compared the drugs, all anticholinergics worked in treating OAB.

Anticholinergics are sold under different brand names. Some are also available as generic drugs. These medications include:

  • oxybutynin
  • solifenacin
  • fesoterodine

All of these drugs except for Oxytrol come as either tablets or capsules that you take by mouth. Oxytrol is available as a skin patch.

The most common side effects of anticholinergic drugs include:

  • dry mouth
  • blurry vision
  • constipation

Seniors have the greatest risk of side effects from these drugs. These medications may also cause drowsiness and an increased risk of falls in seniors. Oxybutynin may cause more side effects than the other drugs in this class. However, taking oxybutynin in its extended-release form may reduce some of the side effects. Anticholinergics may also worsen dementia symptoms and should be used with caution in people with this disease.

What Is An Overactive Bladder Symptoms To Look For

drugs used in the treatment of overactive bladder oab 1

Overactive bladder is a syndrome, or a set of symptoms, that is believed to be due to sudden contractions of the muscles in the wall of the bladder. When you have overactive bladder syndrome, the muscles controlling bladder function start acting involuntarily. This often leads to urinary incontinence or loss of bladder control. The urine leakage experienced by someone with OAB can be as little as several drops to up to several ounces. Sometimes, incontinence can be a sign of something simple like drinking way too many caffeinated beverages on a daily basis. Other times the underlying cause can be something more serious.

An overactive bladder is said to account for 40 to 70 percent of incontinence. What is incontinence? Incontinence is a lack of voluntary control over urination or defecation. When you have overactive bladder, you can experience urinary incontinence or loss of control over urination.

There are actually two different types of overactive bladder. Dry is when you have a sudden, urgent need to urinate many times during the day. Wet means you have the sudden, urgent need to urinate and you experience bladder leakage, which is also referred to as urge incontinence. Both dry and wet can occur without any underlying health condition. An estimated 60 percent of OAB patients have dry OAB while 40 percent have wet OAB .

OAB symptoms can differ on an individual case basis. Common symptoms of an overactive bladder include:

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Complementary And Alternative Medicine

There are many complementary and alternative therapies used to treat OAB. These include mind-body therapies that help minimize urinary urgency and symptoms of stress incontinence .

Naturopathic doctors and others also use herbal remedies to treat OAB, but few of these are strongly supported by research. Among those that have some evidence of a positive effect are:

  • Gosha-jinki-gan : This traditional Chinese medicine remedy is composed of 10 herbs. Animal studies suggest GJC can mute bladder sensations that contribute to urinary urgency. Small studies in women and men have shown positive results, albeit with side effects in 1 in 10 users .
  • Saw palmetto: Saw palmetto is a popular herbal remedy said to increase testosterone levels and alleviate prostate enlargement that can contribute to OAB symptoms in men. A 12-week study involving 44 men with OAB reported improved bladder control and decreased prostate size compared to men who didnt take it.

Always speak with your healthcare provider before using a herbal remedy to treat OAB. The overuse of herbal remedies, especially imported ones, can expose you to substances that may be toxic to your liver and kidneys or interact with drugs you are taking.

Other Bladder Control Medications

If symptoms of urinary incontinence are thought to be caused by an enlarged prostate, different medications can be offered to reduce these symptoms. The prostate gland wraps around the urethra , and if it is enlarged, it could squeeze the urinary passage tight, making the emptying of bladder more difficult and incomplete.

In brief, the following categories are available for the treatment of urinary symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate :

  • Alpha-blockers, terazosin , doxyzosin , alfuzosin , silodosin , and tamsulosin , work by relaxing the muscles around the urethra and prostate, thus, making urination more comfortable and complete. These medications start to relieve symptoms within a few weeks, but they do not affect the prostate size.
  • 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, finasteride and dutasteride , work by reducing the size of the prostate gland. They may take several months to become effective.

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Natural Remedies For An Overactive Bladder

1. Kegel Exercises

If a weak pelvic floor is at the root of your OAB then kegel exercises can help a lot. These pelvic floor exercises can be done anywhere at anytime and they benefit both men and women. When done regularly, they can really help an overactive bladder.

Melody Denson, MD, a board-certified urologist with the Urology Team in Austin, TX, recommends these exercises for OAB. She says, They will trigger a reflex mechanism to relax the bladder. If you feel a tremendous urge to urinate, doing a kegel before you run to the bathroom will help settle down the bladder spasm and help you hold it until you get there.

2. Avoid Dietary Triggers

Significantly reduce the following foods and drinks that are known to contribute to overactive bladder:

  • Alcohol
  • Soda and other carbonated beverages
  • Spicy foods
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Milk and milk products
  • Sugar and high sugar foods

Caffeine, alcohol and certain medications like diuretics are known to be major causes of acute incontinence, especially in the elderly population. Cranberry juice is surprisingly another thing to avoid if you have OAB. Although cranberry juice is often recommend for bladder health, it actually acts as an irritant if you have OAB.

3. Watch Fluid Intake

4. Double-Void

5. Schedule bathroom trips

6. Delay Urination

7. Try Acupuncture

8. Stop Smoking

Drug Therapy For Overactive Bladder

Treatment Options for Overactive Bladder and Bowel

Home » Treatments » Drug therapy for overactive bladder

  • Go to:
  • 4.1 What if my drug treatment does not improve my OAB symptoms?
  • OAB symptoms are more common as people age, but they are not a normal part of ageing. They can be treated.

    If you have bothersome symptoms, it is important that you go to your doctor. Try not to be embarrassed in discussing your situation. If self-management and lifestyle changes cannot control your symptoms, your doctor may suggest drug therapy. The goal is to reduce the urgent need to urinate and the number of times you need to go, as well as to prevent leakage episodes. Drugs used for OAB are antimuscarinic drugs or mirabegron . Together with your doctor, you can decide which type of drug treatment is best for you.

    Factors which influence this decision include:

    • Your symptoms
    • Any other medication you are taking
    • Drugs available in your country
    • Your personal preferences and values

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    Overactive Bladder: Causes + 8 Natural Remedies

    By Annie Price, CHHC

    Have you ever thought about your bladder control or how often you urinate each day? Probably not, unless youve experienced a bladder control problem like overactive bladder. Overactive bladder is a condition in which the bladder cannot hold urine normally. One of the most common symptoms of this health problem is urinary incontinence or leaking urine. Many people suffer in silence, but if you are currently experiencing a bladder-related difficulty you are truly not alone. Its estimated that at least 33 million Americans have overactive bladder. ” rel=”nofollow”> 1)

    Sometimes a person experiencing overactive bladder doesnt have any underlying health problem. Other times, an overactive bladder can be the result of medications or other more serious health issues, such as diabetes, kidney disease, multiple sclerosis or Parkinsons disease. OAB can also occur after surgery or childbirth. How much is too much when it comes to urination? People with OAB typically have to urinate more than 8 times per day or more than once at night.

    Its crucial to address overactive bladder symptoms right away. Early treatment can reduce, or even completely get rid of, the highly unwanted symptoms. With some time and effort, there are several very doable and natural ways you can overcome an overactive bladder.

    Prescription Drugs For Overactive Bladder

    There are several prescription drugs for overactive bladder .

    The FDA approved medications, or drugs, currently available on the U.S. market for the treatment of urinary incontinence are for a specific condition called overactive bladder . Some are also used for OAB with urge urinary incontinence . You may have seen advertisements on television or in magazines for these medications. Most of the prescription drugs for OAB partially calm the bladder muscles that cause abnormal contractions, thereby reducing the frequency and severity of the overwhelming urge to urinate. Some of these drugs may also increase the bladders capacity to hold urine and delay the initial urge to void. This class of drugs is referred to as antimuscarinics.

    The currently FDA approved antimuscarinic drugs for OAB are: Oxybutynin, Tolterodine, Solifenacin, Hyoscyamine, and Darifenacin. These drugs are sold under the names of: Ditropan, Detrol, Vesicare, Enablex, Levbid, Cytospaz and Oxytrol. Most of these are oral medications and need a doctors prescription. Only one drug will be available over-the-counter as of September 2013, and it is in a skin patch form for women only.

    Note: Drugs that are currently approved may be suddenly taken off the market, and new drugs are being introduced. Your healthcare provider and pharmacist can help you know which current drugs on the market may be the best for your circumstances.

    Who May Need a Prescription?

    Possible Side Effects

    Key Points to Remember

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    Introduction To Overactive Bladder

    Overactive bladder is a term used to refer to a set of symptoms that affect the urinary system. Overactive bladder typically causes urinary incontinence or an involuntary loss of bladder control leading to urine leakage. The overactive bladder also causes frequent and urgent need to urinate. According to the Urology Care Foundation, overactive bladder affects over 30 million Americans. Women are more likely to have an overactive bladder than men. ” rel=”nofollow”> 3,4,5)

    Some of the symptoms of overactive bladder include:

    • Having sudden urges to urinate.
    • Need to urinate more frequently than normal.
    • Need to urinate more than once or twice during the night.
    • Urine leakage or urinary incontinence.
    • Not being able to control urination.

    These symptoms interfere with and disrupt your day-to-day life. It is challenging to manage the symptoms of this condition because an overactive bladder is often unpredictable. This causes people with overactive bladder to restrict their social lives, impacting the quality of their life. The disease is also likely to trigger emotional distress, causing them to stay isolated, with many suffering from depression.

    While there is no cure for overactive bladder, the good news is that there are many ways to manage this condition. These include lifestyle changes, behavioral treatments, medications, and in some cases, surgery.

    Drugs For Overactive Bladder

    Drugs used to treat overactive bladder*

    In people with overactive bladder, muscles in the bladder wall contract at the wrong time. A group of drugs called anticholinergics combat this problem by blocking the nerve signals related to bladder muscle contractions. Research suggests that these drugs also might increase bladder capacity and decrease the urge to go.

    Anticholinergic drugs include:

    Oxytrol for women is the only drug available over the counter. Overall, these drugs work about the same in treating overactive bladder, and generally people tolerate all of them well. The main side effect is dry mouth, but anticholinergics also can cause constipation, blurred vision, and increased heartbeat.

    Anticholinergics aren’t right for everyone. Some people with glaucoma, urinary retention, or gastrointestinal disease should avoid using anticholinergic drugs.

    The drugs mirabegron and vibegron called beta-3 adrenergic agonists. These medications work by activating a protein receptor in bladder muscles that relaxes them and helps the bladder fill and store urine.

    Another type of drug for overactive bladder is the tricyclic antidepressantimipramine hydrochloride , which also relaxes bladder muscles.

    Doctors also treat men with drugs that relax a muscle at the bladder neck and prostate to help with emptying. They include:

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    Overactive Bladder Medication Over The Counter

    When you are suffering from overactive bladder , it can be easy to run to the drugstore or your local supermarket to look for a quick solution. But does the easiest option mean it will be effective? In this article we will explore overactive bladder medication that is over the counter to see if it is an effective treatment option.

    Over-the-counter overactive bladder medications are an easy option, but they might not work for everyone. Symptoms often vary between people, and depending on what you experience, speaking with a doctor and getting a prescription may be a better option.

    Rationale For Anticholinergic Use

    Detrusor muscle contractions are essential for normal micturition, but involuntary contractions produce the symptoms of overactive bladder. Contractions depend on the activation of muscarinic receptors in the bladder by acetylcholine. The M3 muscarinic receptor-subtype is thought to be the most important in regulating detrusor contractions.

    Anticholinergic drugs block muscarinic receptor activation and inhibit the spontaneous detrusor contractions found in overactive bladder. Drug efficacy is dose-dependent, but effectiveness is often limited by unwanted antimuscarinic effects in distant organs where other acetylcholine receptor-subtypes predominate . These adverse effects are also dose-dependent. They commonly include dry mouth, dry eyes, confusion, constipation, somnolence, blurred vision and increased heart rate.

    There are no currently available drugs with pure selectivity for the muscarinic receptors in the detrusor. To try to improve the benefit:harm ratio a number of anticholinergics have been developed with greater selectivity for the detrusor or the M3 receptor, or with extended release properties.

    Recommended Reading: Does Cranberry Juice Help Bladder Problems

    What Behavioral Changes Can I Make To Help With Overactive Bladder

    There are many techniques and changes to your typical behavior that you can try to help with an overactive bladder. These can include:

    Keeping a log: During a typical day, write down your fluid intake, the number of times you urinate, the number of accidents and when they occur. Make a note about what happened when the accident happened, like when you:

    • Cough.
    • Laugh.
    • Were unable to reach the bathroom in time.

    Monitoring your diet: Eliminate or decrease foods or beverages that may worsen your bladder symptoms. These could include:

    • Tea.
    • Spicy and acidic foods and drinks.
    • Foods and drinks that contain artificial sweeteners.

    Maintaining bowel regularity: Constipation can place added pressure on the bladder and have a negative effect on your bladder function. By keeping healthy bowel habits, you may be able to avoid constipation and help to lessen bladder symptoms. The following are some suggestions for maintaining bowel regularity:

    • Increase your fiber intake by eating foods like beans, pasta, oatmeal, bran cereal, whole wheat bread, and fresh fruit and vegetables.
    • Every morning, take 2 tablespoons of this mixture: 1 cup apple sauce, 1 cup unprocessed wheat bran, and ¾ cup prune juice.
    • Exercise regularly to maintain regular bowel movements.

    Maintaining a healthy weight: Being overweight can add pressure on your bladder, which may contribute to bladder control problems. If you are overweight, weight loss can reduce the pressure on your bladder.

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